Wiktor Dyndo – Nina Haab

 

Post-History

 

September 30 – November 19, 2021

 

 

 

Nina Haab, Peppy Wrecks, 2021,  pencil on wood, detail

Wiktor Dyndo, Breaking News 7, 2020,  oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm

Wiktor Dyndo, Breaking News 3, 2020,  oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm

Wiktor Dyndo, Breaking News 9, 2020,  oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm

Wiktor Dyndo, Breaking News 5, 2020,  oil on canvas, 100 x 100 cm

Nina Haab, Vue sur Jersey 11, 2020,  pencil on paper, 29.7 x 21 cm

Nina Haab, Vue sur Jersey 11, 2020,  detail

Nina Haab, Locus Amoenus 2, 2021,  pencil on paper, 48 x 68 cm

Nina Haab, Locus Amoenus 2, 2021, detail

 

Revolving about the concept of wait and its role in public and private narratives, the two artists of the exhibition Post-History investigate dimensions of time and storytelling.

Swiss artist Nina Haab explores the mechanisms of temporal suspension, the construction of memories and the act of remembering. The installation Peppy Wrecks (2021) celebrates embracing the unknown and the ability of existing in contradictions as acts of resilience while overcoming adversities. Two parts of one unique piece of furniture appear to us standing on sand, carrying on their surfaces mysterious drawings and the sentence: “You wouldn’t have guessed”. Along with Peppy Wrecks, Haab’s new series Locus Amoenus (2020) deals with the topos of an idyllic place capable to heal the body and the mind, while her drawings from Vue sur Jersey (2018-2020), remind us of the impossibility to have the totality of the picture where private and global narratives intertwine.

Questions connected to notions of reality and their representations are also related to Wiktor Dyndo’s practice. The Warsaw-based painter works with a realist style to increase the un-easiness of a world that, through an overwhelming and ubiquitous media-apparatus, has become “too real, too frightening”: too close and too ungraspable. His series Breaking News (2019-2020) presents the homonymous’ caption superposed on still lives, seashores, or baroque interiors. This heightens the effect of waiting for an event, for something to “happen”, to manifest, while using for these estheticized images the typical square format of the Instagram feed. Questioning the role of information and meaning in contemporary societies, Dyndo produces visual breaks that are both static and frantic, reflecting on notions of anxiety and wait.

 

 

Copyright  ©  Galeria Szydłowski  2021